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Jeffrey Williams

Brite Divinity School educates and inspires people to serve God's diverse world as leaders in churches, the academy, and public life.

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Biography

Jeffrey Williams came to Brite in 2005 as Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs and joined the faculty in 2010. His teaching and research interests are in the areas of American Religious History and religion and violence. A member of the American Academy of Religion and American Society of Church History, Williams is the author of Religion and Violence in Early American Methodism: Taking the Kingdom by Force (Indiana University Press, 2010). His current research focuses on religion, global geography, and national identity in the Early American Republic.

Degrees

Ph.D. Claremont Graduate University, School of Religion
M.A. Vanderbilt University
M.A.R. Westminster Theological Seminary
B.A. Franklin and Marshall College

Courses

  • Anglican History
  • Methods and Models for Research and Project Development
  • Christianity and Social Action in US History

Books

  • Institutional Change in Theological Education: A History of Brite Divinity School. co-edited this with Mark G. Toulouse and Dyan M. Dietz. (Fort Worth: TCU Press, 2011).
  • Religion and Violence in Early American Methodism: Taking the Kingdom by Force. (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2010)

Journal Articles, Book Chapters and Book Reviews

  • “Dying To Save: The Sacrifice of Children in the Harry Potter and The Hunger Games Series.” Journal of Religion and Popular Culture, vol. 30:2 (Summer 2018): 75-86.
  • “Living Into Brite’s Incorporation, 1989-2009,” with Dyan M. Dietz. Institutional Change in Theological Education: A History of Brite Divinity School. (Fort Worth: Texas Christian University, 2012).
  • “Capitalism, the Bible, and American Christianity,” Encyclopedia of the Bible and Its Reception, ed. Hans-Josef Klauck et al (Berlin: de Gruyter, 2012).
  • “Pacifism and Conscientious Objection,” Encyclopedia of Religion in America, ed. Charles H. Lippy and Peter W. Williams (Washington D.C.: CQ Press, 2010)
  • “‘The Power to Kill and Make Alive’: ‘Violence’ and the Religious World of Early Methodists,” Methodist History XLVI, no. 2 (January 2008): 87-100.

Presentations

  • “Global Desires and Indigenous Violence: Tahitian Sacrifice and Child Murder in the American Missionary Imagination,” American Society of Church History Winter Meeting, January 2019, Chicago, Illinois.
  • “Dying to Save: Child Sacrifice in Harry Potter and The Hunger Games,” November 2014, Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion, San Diego, California.
  • “‘The Kingdom of Heaven Suffers Force’”: Religion and Violence in the Early American Republic,” October 2005, Canadian Association of American Studies, Halifax, Nova Scotia.
  • “Conversion and Communitas: Rethinking the Historiography on Early American Methodism,” November 2003, American Academy of Religion, Atlanta, Georgia.
  • “The Male Body as Afflicted and Afflicter: Evangelicalism and Masculinity in the Early American Republic,” November 2002, American Academy of Religion, Toronto, Canada.

Professional Affiliations

American Academy of Religion
American Society of Church History